Growing Reader

7 Books Ideal for Reading with Kids Ages 6 – 8

by Eliza Smith

read together be together
Image credit: Blend Images - REB Images/Getty Images

Your child may be growing more independent every day, but that doesn’t mean you have to give up reading together any time soon. We’ve rounded up some of our absolute favorite books for reading aloud with your 6- to 8-year-old. Pass a book back and forth, let them take the lead, or travel through these picture books side by side. No matter how you read together, you’ll be glad you did.

  • Daniel Finds a Poem

    by Micha Archer

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    What does poetry mean to you? For the squirrel Daniel speaks to, poetry is the sound of crisp leaves crunching; for the spider, it's the way morning dew glistens on a tightly spun web. As Daniel moves throughout the world, he finds poetry everywhere - and soon, you'll start discovering it too.

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  • A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

    by Fred Rogers, illustrated by Luke Flowers

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    One of the joys of reading with your children is sharing the words and characters that delighted you as a child. With this cheerfully illustrated collection of lyrics from Mister Rogers' Neighborhood and The Children's Corner, you can re-experience the soothing wisdom of Mister Rogers and spark conversations about emotions and kindness, self-awareness and self-esteem, and the many invaluable topics his songs address.

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  • Jon Klassen’s Hat Box

    by Jon Klassen

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    Laughter is an essential part of reading together, and Jon Klassen's hat trilogy will certainly do the trick. In I Want My Hat Back, an insistent bear tracks down the clues to find his missing hat. In This Is Not My Hat, a behatted fish is on the run (or should we say swim?). And in We Found a Hat, two turtles must decide what to do with their thrilling treasure. Deceptively simple yet utterly hilarious, the series has solidified itself as a reader favorite.

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  • A New Kind of Wild

    by Zara Gonzalez Hoang

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    Inspired by her father's stories of moving from Puerto Rico to New York as a child, author-illustrator Zara González Hoang created a poignant story about the power of friendship and finding magic in new places. In the book, Ren has moved from his grandmother's forest home to a bustling (and decidedly not green) city, but Ava helps him find the beauty of his new surroundings. If your family is spending more time inside, perhaps A New Kind of Wild will help your reader look around their home with fresh eyes.

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  • Interrupting Chicken

    by David Ezra Stein

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    As Papa tries to read the little red chicken a few fairytales at bedtime, the excited little chicken can't help herself from interrupting - and inserting herself into the stories to save the day. Long-suffering Papa valiantly presses on, and the stories inside the story become more layered and amusing with each earnest revision. The shenanigans continue in Interrupting Chicken and the Elephant of Surprise.

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  • Library Lion

    by Michelle Knudsen

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    In a quiet, small-town library, head librarian Miss Merriweather runs a tight ship. There are rules to spending time in the library, after all. But when a soft-footed lion saunters in and establishes himself as a gentle backrest for young readers, Miss Merriweather can't accuse the lion of breaking any rules. A moment of crisis and a happy ending make this story perfectly unforgettable.

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  • The Girl Who Named Pluto

    by Alice B. McGinty, illustrated by Elizabeth Haidle

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    Did you know it was an 11-year-girl who named the newly-discovered Pluto in 1930? This gorgeously illustrated picture book tells the story of how Venetia Burney grew interested in astronomy, and how that interest combined with her love for Roman mythology to inspire the name Pluto. The uplifting true story of a young person leaving her mark on the galaxy will have your reader looking to the stars.

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  • For more reading tips and book lists, visit Read Together, Be Together. This nationwide movement, developed by Penguin Random House in partnership with Parents magazine, celebrates the importance, and power, of the shared reading experience between an adult and a child. Reading aloud regularly to babies and young children is one of the most effective ways to foster early literacy and is a key factor responsible for building language and social skills.